Cephalopod Coffeehouse March 2014–Featuring OPEN MINDS

Welcome one and all to the Cephalopod Coffeehouse, a cozy gathering of book lovers, meeting to discuss their thoughts regarding the tomes they enjoyed most over the previous month.  Pull up a chair, order your cappuccino and join in the fun.

This month I want to share a great book I’ve loved for a bit, but revisited recently. It’s a dystopian YA, near-futuristic novel where everyone reads minds. Well, everyone except for Kira.

OPEN MINDS is a suspense-filled journey into science, prejudice, and morality from best-selling indie author Susan Kaye Quinn.

Open Minds (Mindjack Trilogy, #1)What’s goin’ on here:

In this world, all the drugs and chemicals that leeched into the water systems caused changes in neural development allowing for pubertal-onset telepathy. Years ago the first telepaths, called Readers, were ostracized, but now it’s so commonplace that big cities have been largely abandoned and houses must sit at a minimum distance so the neighbors can’t overhear what’s happening next door. At sixteen, Kira’s passed the point where she would transition into a Reader. Considered a Zero, Kira’s in the minority and destined for the menial jobs assigned to those with closed minds. Not the future she envisioned. And it troubles her would-be boyfriend Raf, as well.

But Kira soon learns that she isn’t a Zero after all. While her mind isn’t open, she has a different ability–the ability to “jack” into others’ minds and cause them to obey her commands. One can imagine the incredible potential of her power. In fact, one does, and he’s a gangster.

See, there are a fair amount of Jackers out there–hidden in plain sight–and they are being sought by two contingents: the Mafia, and the Government. While trying to save Raf from certain death, Kira blows her Jacker cover and is rounded up into an internment camp where government scientists study the “jacker problem”.  Much like the internment camps of World War II, Kira and her fellow refugees have no rights, no help, and no recourse against the potentially fatal ‘treatments’ they endure.

In order to survive, Kira must team with adversaries who would just as soon kill her. Good thing she’s a Super-Jacker, and her skills may be strong enough to free them all. But, even if she does escape where can she go? Her family will undoubtedly become targets. And, the agents running the camp will surely track her down. The resolution is a pell-mell race for Kira to save not only herself, but young Jackers in the government testing labs.

Kira is a strong MC, and her steadfast commitment to doing the right thing, even if it’s hard, gives readers a protag worthy of respect. It’s a super-fast read that tackles real societal problems with grace and confidence. I read this book in a day. Mostly because I couldn’t stop until I knew Kira was safe.

The great thing? OPEN MINDS is a FREE eBook on Amazon and Barnes & Noble. OPEN MINDS is the first in a trilogy, but has a satisfactory ending that resolves completely while leaving some room for the companion books.

Thanks for popping by! Please click the links below to catch up with my fellow Coffeehousers. And, as always, keep reading my friends!

1. The Armchair Squid 2. I Think: Therefore, I Yam
3. A Creatve Exercise 4. this and that…
5. The Random Book Review 6. The Writing Sisterhood
7. Read, Write, Review 8. StrangePegs — Dead and Moaning in Las Vegas
9. Quill or Pill 10. Trisha @ WORD STUFF
11. Huntress 12. MOCK!
13. Words Incorportated 14. Hungry Enough To Eat Six
15. Ed and Reub 16. V’s Reads
17. StrangePegs — The Sparrow

13 thoughts on “Cephalopod Coffeehouse March 2014–Featuring OPEN MINDS

  1. After reading your review I decided to download it on to my Kindle only to find it is already there! Now it is to the fore of my mind I’ll start it after my current book. Thank you.

  2. This sounds like a terrific book. I’m a far cry from YA, but have read a number of really good YA books over the past couple of years. (Which is kinda funny, because I never read any at all when I WAS a YA.) At any rate, thanks for the recommendation; the comparison to WWII internment camps is what really sold it to me. I’ve blogged about those camps several times, and am curious to see how Susan (such a nice name!) describes the camps in her book. And hey, the price is definitely right! I’ll grab a copy today. Thanks!

  3. The premise is great. I love how in fiction, the crazy chemicals in the water can give us all superpowers rather than killing us – not unlike superhero origin stories of the 1960s.

    A book you read in a day – certainly a strong selling point.

    • Er, well, I read pretty fast. Still, I think it sucks the reader in…
      And, yes! It’s a harkening to SwampThing, IMHO. Of course, Sue may disagree. It’s kinda a super flip, though. Nearly everyone has extraordinary powers, and the very small minority lack them. Those poor Zeroes have it rough.

      • That sounds fun. I’ve seen other fiction worlds like that, Piers Anthony’s Xanth novels come to mind. Everyone has a magic power and if you don’t, you’re exiled. Alan Moore’s Top Ten series is a bit like that, too.

  4. Thanks for your marvelous posting! I certainly enjoyed reading
    it, you’re a great author.I will always bookmark your blog and definitely will come back
    sometime soon. I want to encourage continue your great writing, have a
    nice afternoon!

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