Managing the MONSTER OF THE WEEK–A Review

Hi there! Today, I’m sharing a review for a paranormal-type YA gay romance from F.T. Lukens. MONSTER OF THE WEEK is a sequel to THE RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR MEDIATING MYTHS AND MAGIC is about a high school senior who takes a part-time job so he can save money for college. But, his new job comes with all sorts of weird, and he’s soon caught up in disaster after disaster.

About the book:
Spring semester of Bridger Whitt’s senior year of high school is looking great. He has the perfect boyfriend, a stellar best friend, and an acceptance letter to college. He also has this incredible job as an assistant to Pavel Chudinov, an intermediary tasked with helping cryptids navigate the modern world. His days are filled with kisses, laughs, pixies, and the occasional unicorn.

Life is awesome.

But as graduation draws near, Bridger’s perfect life begins to unravel. Uncertainties about his future surface, his estranged dad shows up out of nowhere, and, perhaps worst of all, a monster-hunting television show arrives in town to investigate the series of strange events from last fall. The show’s intrepid host will not be deterred, and Bridger finds himself trapped in a game of cat and mouse that could very well put the myth world at risk. Again.

My Review:
Bridger Whitt is a high school senior with mere months to graduation. He’s dating an almost-hero, Leo, and a fab job helping intermediary Pavel Chudinov to help keep cryptids (think sasquatch), myths and magic folk from being noticed by humans. IN this he’s aided by his human bestie Astrid, Elena the werewolf, and a pair of pixies, Nia and Bran, and now his familiar “Marv” (aka Midnight Marvel) who looks like a kitten, but is not. Marv was a gift for his 18th birthday. Though Bridger and Leo have been dating a few months, they’re both still “unicorn-friendly” which means they’re virgins, because a unicorn will not approach a person who is sexually impure.

Bridger has been raised by his mom, but his absentee father has inexplicably returned and wants to build a relationship now that Bridger’s about to head off to college. It’s shady, but Bridger is used to the weird. What he’s not used to is having a reporter hanging around his tiny town of Midden, Michigan. Summer Lore is the host of the “Monster of the Week” show, and though she seems to be rather bored of doing her bit, she’s still an investigative reporter. It’s not long before Summer is trailing Bridger all over town, and trying to find out what happened when Bridger nearly drowned last term–in a rare and unexpected merpeople attack. While Astrid and Bridger try to diffuse this situation, some of his classmates are vying for the TV camera attention.

Summer’s aggressive tactics may be freaking Bridger out, but Pavel’s not that worried. Well, he puts Summer on warning, but Bridger knows it’s a matter of time before she’s at him again. Prom’s coming and Bridger and Leo are in the running for Prom Kings–which is a situation Leo’s dad has trouble understanding. But that’s not the worst thing. No, the worst thing is Summer trying to pry cryptid secrets from Bridger, even if she has to steal them…

This is as sweet and funny a story as the first book in the series. Bridger is an awkward and compassionate character and all his friends are interesting and cool. There’s some really troublesome issues surrounding Pavel’s position and Bridger’s status as his assistant–because of Summer’s interference. I loved getting to see Prom with a dash of magic a la magic portal, and graduation that becomes a bit of a showdown, what with the clashing guests. Bridger barely makes it to graduation, thanks to an out-of-control myth, but ends the book happily, in a lightly less unicorn-friendly state. It’s all tender and YA appropriate, and a book I’d read over and over. The one part I’m sad over is it seems that we’ve reached the end of this series! Otherwise, highly recommend.

Interested? You can find MONSTER OF THE WEEK on Goodreads, Interlude Press, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, iTunes, and Kobo.

About the Author:
F.T. wrote her first short story when she was in third grade and her love of writing continued from there. After placing in the top five out of ten thousand entries in a writing contest, she knew it was time to dive in and try her hand at writing a novel.

A wife and mother of three, F.T. holds degrees in psychology and English literature, and is a long-time member of her college’s science-fiction club. F.T. has a love of cheesy television shows, superhero movies, and science-fiction novels—especially anything by Douglas Adams.

Connect with F.T. on her website, Twitter, Tumblr and on Goodreads.

Thanks for popping in, and keep reading my friends!

Behold ANTIGODDESS

Antigoddess (Goddess War, #1)Had a bit of a mind blow  when I encountered this sentiment:  Immortal does not mean eternal.

Truly, there are subtleties to the words. Immortal means to not die, to not be liable to death, whereas, Eternal means forever existing. But if something doesn’t die, it’s eternal, right?

No. If it was created, it can be uncreated.

And, it turns out, the pantheon of Greek gods was created. Who knew?

So, why am I waxing all philosophical about the shades of difference between immortal  and eternal?

Simple.

Got meself an ARC of ANTIGODDESS, due out September 10th, Book One in the The Goddess War series by Kendare Blake—so I read it.

Definitely liked it.

What’s it about, you wonder?

Greek gods living–or I should say dying–in the here and now.

I see you over there shaking your head and wagging that pointy appendage. Yes, you, you beady-eyed provincial!  Of course, contemporary mythology is an oxymoron.

Gimmick, you say? Point well taken, but–gimmick or no–this YA yarn tracking the end of the Titans is a stellar read.

This multi-viewpoint adventure tracks sibling gods, Athena and Hermes, as they endeavor to discover what force of the universe is killing them. Athena’s choking on owl feathers developing within her body. Hermes is ravaged by a steady fever. Both retain some of their god-like powers–strength, wit, speed—but each are diminished. The key to their survival seems to be held by a teen psychic, Cassie—the reincarnation of Cassandra of Troy—whom they must find. Only Cassandra can foresee how to defeat the enemy gods who wish to finish Athena and Hermes off prematurely.

Cassandra wishes she knew why her visions don’t extend past her 18th birthday. Will she be alive, or will her powers simply expire? What she does know is she loves Aiden, but their relationship falls into serious jeopardy when she learns his epic past. Is he even human?

This book ends with a solid battle and more than one god bites it. I would not call it a happy ending—but it is a satisfactory resolution. Throughout we get an imaginative look at Odysseus, Apollo, Poseidon, Hera, Aphrodite, and the stage is set for Book Two—no question.

I loved how each god had his/her own unique mannerisms. Athena–goddess of war and wisdom–is naturally austere, and totally fashion unaffected. Meanwhile Hermes–messenger of the gods and god of thieves–is a creature of comfort and has no qualms stealing the best clothes, food or lodgings on their travels.

Though this is YA I really found the sexual tension between Athena and her favored hero, Odysseus, to be interesting. ANTIGODDESS is clean as a whistle and age-appropriate to young teens, so I wonder how this attraction will play out in the coming books.

And now I’m wondering how to get me a copy of the next book…

Look for ANTIGODDESS in bookstores September 10th or pre-order at the usual places.

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Since I’m crawling with books, I’m offering up this ARC of ANTIGODDESS for YOU! (US addresses only.)

Just leave me a comment about which Greek god you’d like to be and why.

Be creative! My 10 y/o son will pick the winner he likes best. Comments close Friday, August 23th.

Make sure to leave your email address with your comment so I know how to contact you…